Friday, November 13, 2015

Weeds Have Taken Over the Barnyard




Breeding season has been delayed a little this year. We should have been more on top of things, but sometimes life happens and you get behind.

A group of  ewes were suppose to go to the barnyard area with one of the rams, but plans changed after we took a look around in there and found quite a bit of Burdock, Thistle, and Nightshade. We have some Burdock and Thistle in the pasture, and the sheep  occasionally come in contact with it, but the barnyard is a more enclosed area, and I knew that we would see some ruined fleeces.  Nightshade is toxic to sheep, so that needed pulled, I didn't want to take any chances that the sheep may eat some.

It is such a challenge to keep weeds, under control. I have heard that Burdock, has some value, but not when it comes to wool. I would love if we could rid the farm of all of these invasive weeds. We mowed the pastures several times this year, as part of our weed management. . The barnyard is too stony to mow, and always seems to be a haven for unwanted weeds. After several hours, I think we were able to get them all.  As we continue to work on improving the pastures, I hope to see less of these plants.

Are you winning the battle against weeds?

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14 comments:

  1. I so feel your pain!

    Burdock root is supposed to be good to eat. And I think I've heard it is really healthy too.

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  2. We never win the battle with weeds, never! We sometimes keep from being overrun, but we're always on the losing side. (-:

    Fern

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  3. Diligent mowing of bull thistles and burdock has significantly reduced the population of these two in/around our barnyard and pastures. If they've begun to flower we gather up the plants, dry and burn them to kill seeds. One that we can't seem to eliminate from the flock's pastures is Canada Thistle, in part due to it being able to spread by their roots.

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  4. Our fields have cleared up quite a bit from regular mowing, but I should keep the sheep out of the creek fields in the fall. We leave cover down there for habitat and erosion prevention and that's fine in the spring and summer, but fall can be a bit "sticky" ;-).

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    Replies
    1. I am hoping to see some improvement with the mowing.

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  5. Wow, that sounds like a job! And why is it that weeds grow so well when other plants, welcome plants, struggle? Good luck with your weed battle.

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    Replies
    1. It hope as we try to improve the pasture-soil, we can lessen the weeds and improve the good grass.

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  6. We are busy identifying the plants both good and bad on the farm....we have some interesting new weeds!

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    Replies
    1. I love finding good plants :) especially ones for dyeing!

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  7. Nope. Haven't won the battle yet and don't expect that I ever will! Yes, Burdock can be eaten. Thistle, if it's the right kind, can be used as a vegan rennet for cheesemaking. I guess if you look at your weeds as potential resources, they don't seem so bad... as long as they aren't in the sheep's pen! :)

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    Replies
    1. Yes, if we could choose where they pop up-wouldn't that be nice :)

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