Friday, September 25, 2015

Our Surprise Pumpkin Patch




We noticed some vines growing in the barnyard this summer, they looked a lot like squash plants.

We had some volunteer plants. I didn't expect them to produce, but produce they did... 30 something pumpkins came from that patch. What a nice Autumn Surprise...

I know they are not really "cooking" pumpkins, but I am going to use some of the smaller ones to make pumpkin puree. I will let you know how it turns out!

What do you do with your extra pumpkins?

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11 comments:

  1. That's a great surprise, Sandra. Maybe I should plant some stealth pumpkins and squash around here and there next year and see if they can escape the squash bugs. 30 pumpkins? That's a great surprise. I would cut the extras up in cubes and can them. They can be used for a number of things besides pies, like bread, yum! Now I'm getting hungry!

    Fern

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  2. Now that is a wonderful surprise! Wowie Wow Wow!

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  3. What a lovely surprise! I have only ever managed to grow 2 pumpkins, so 30 would be quite amazing! Hope you enjoy them.

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    Replies
    1. I wonder if we had planted them, if they would have done so well! :)

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  4. Great surprise! How fun and I'm glad you're going to use them. I heard that a pumpkin is a pumpkin, and they can all be used for pies or whatever. We had a similar surprise here growing out of the compost pile and into the dog lot which is an acre lot. There were four pie pumpkins, but I won't be using them for pies or any food because no one my family can handle that thought, lol. If it were cows, goats, or sheep in there I'd be tempted but dogs...no way.
    They are looking pretty proud and fall-ish on the front porch though. :)

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, I don't blame you!
      They do make for great fall decor!

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  5. I dehydrated some last year as an experiment to add to stews and it seems to have worked out fairly well.

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    Replies
    1. I have never dehydrated pumpkin, great idea!

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  6. My grandmother also subscribed to "a pumpkin is a pumpkin". The decorative ones often have a bit more water, but she had a flavorful solution: at a time when you are going to be in the kitchen for a while, pour some puree into a large, flat, heavy bottomed pan. Cook it down until it is thickened. Now comes the tasty part. Turn down the heat on the stove. Push all of the puree to one side and leave a thin layer on the other side. Cook it slowly until it starts to caramelize. Don't worry about it sticking. When it starts to brown, push all of the other puree over it leaving a thin layer on the other side. As the second side caramelizes, the first side is softening. When you push it back, the browned bits come up, too. Repeat this until you have a rich, thick, paste of pumpkin. It makes wonderful pies, and doesn't take as much space in the freezer.

    My other grandmother maintained that pumpkin pie didn't taste complete without allspice.

    Both ladies were born in Minnesota in 1903 and grew up on farms. I learned a lot from them. Give it a try!

    ReplyDelete
  7. My grandmother also subscribed to "a pumpkin is a pumpkin". The decorative ones often have a bit more water, but she had a flavorful solution: at a time when you are going to be in the kitchen for a while, pour some puree into a large, flat, heavy bottomed pan. Cook it down until it is thickened. Now comes the tasty part. Turn down the heat on the stove. Push all of the puree to one side and leave a thin layer on the other side. Cook it slowly until it starts to caramelize. Don't worry about it sticking. When it starts to brown, push all of the other puree over it leaving a thin layer on the other side. As the second side caramelizes, the first side is softening. When you push it back, the browned bits come up, too. Repeat this until you have a rich, thick, paste of pumpkin. It makes wonderful pies, and doesn't take as much space in the freezer.

    My other grandmother maintained that pumpkin pie didn't taste complete without allspice.

    Both ladies were born in Minnesota in 1903 and grew up on farms. I learned a lot from them. Give it a try!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for taking the time to share that information with me!

      Delete

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