Thursday, May 29, 2014

Making Hay on Shares




We have a 20 acre field and half of it was planted in hay, which we harvested last year.
After much consideration we decided to plant the rest of the field in hay, instead of leasing it out.

In 2013 , we paid a gentleman to custom bale it for us, and we paid per bale.
This year we are working with him on the other acreage. We split the cost of the seed and fertilizer, he planted it and when it comes time to put up the hay, we are doing shares.

We decided to do shares for several reasons-

~We do not need to purchase any equipment.
You need several pieces of equipment to do hay, a mower, rake, and baler. Working with someone who does hay as part of their living is an alternative to having to invest the money into the equipment, ourselves.

~We do not have the time.
Extra time is not something we have right now. We have plenty of pots in the fire! You have to choose where your going to focus your energy, and our focus right now is raising sheep, and wool. You add family, a full time job (Mike) homeschooling, gardening, etc. we don't have the time needed for another venture.

~We want a good hay source.

Nothing is more frustrating than not being able to find good hay, as winter approaches  Some years it has been very difficult!  Last year, it was so nice to not have to worry about it.

~We save money.
When you do shares, you typically split the cost of seed and fertilizer. Your provide the land and they provide the labor. It is less money out of pocket.
Hay cost vary from year to year. Some years we have paid $3.00 and other years closer to $6.00 a bale. With shares, we know we will get half of what is harvested. With the amount of animals we have, we have more than enough to get through the winter, as well as have extra hay, that we can sell, which helps offset the cost.




If you have some extra land, and want to grow your own hay, but don't have the equipment or time, doing shares is one option.

If you decide to do shares with someone, whether it is in hay, crops, etc. be sure to do it with someone you trust! We have had some, not so pleasant outcomes, in the past. It can be very disappointing to pay out money, to only have it wasted.  References are always a good idea!



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The HomeAcre Hop #72





 
We have been on hiatus for a good week. Sometimes you just need a break from the everyday.
 Now, we are busy playing  catch up! That's okay, it was well worth it.



Welcome to the HomeAcre Hop~

Looking forward to your Homesteading, Homeschooling, and Homemaking post


 HomeAcre  Host

Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front
Jenny@Black Fox Homestead
Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre
Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Heidi@Pint Size Farm
and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal



Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)

 

Featured Post:

From Barn to Table, Eating the Meat you Raise from Spring Mountain Living.


Eating the Meat You Raise


Congratulations!
 We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.

Be sure to check out the HomeAcre Hop Pinterest Board where we share our Hop Favorites each week.


Clearwater Farm Journal
Featured




You are invited to share your original posts on: Homesteading, livestock care, gardening, environmentally friendly farming, self sufficiency, preparedness, off grid living, healthy recipes, home remedies and herbal concoctions, green living, homeschooling, food preservation, environmentally friendly crafts and home decor, photo posts of natural living and homesteading subjects! Now that’s a lot of information to share! If it fits any of these topics, we want to hear about it.  There are just a few little rules to follow:
  • Family friendly posts only. 
  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Link as many appropriate posts as you’d like each week. Older posts are great too.
  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop (on either host’s blog) with the button, text link, on the post, your side bar,or blog hop  page and please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business. 
  • Only share content that you have created.
  • Please remember that the whole idea of a blog hop is to visit the other bloggers and make connections and friendships…so share the linky love!
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include one photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way 
                 To keep things fresh on the Hop PLEASE do not share a post that you have previously linked up.


          Any post that does not fit in the guidelines will be removed. Thank you for participating!!
 Clearwater Farm Journal











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Thursday, May 22, 2014

The HomeAcre Hop #71


  


Welcome to the HomeAcre Hop~
Looking forward to your Homesteading, Homeschooling, and Homemaking post


 HomeAcre  Host

Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front
Jenny@Black Fox Homestead
Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre
Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Heidi@Pint Size Farm
and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal



Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)

 

Featured Post:

Why You Want a Rain Barrel from Gentleman Homestead

 0FinishedBarrel


Congratulations!
 We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.

Be sure to check out the HomeAcre Hop Pinterest Board where we share our Hop Favorites each week.

Clearwater Farm Journal
Featured




You are invited to share your original posts on: Homesteading, livestock care, gardening, environmentally friendly farming, self sufficiency, preparedness, off grid living, healthy recipes, home remedies and herbal concoctions, green living, homeschooling, food preservation, environmentally friendly crafts and home decor, photo posts of natural living and homesteading subjects! Now that’s a lot of information to share! If it fits any of these topics, we want to hear about it.  There are just a few little rules to follow:
  • Family friendly posts only. 
  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Link as many appropriate posts as you’d like each week. Older posts are great too.
  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop (on either host’s blog) with the button, text link, on the post, your side bar,or blog hop  page and please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business. 
  • Only share content that you have created.
  • Please remember that the whole idea of a blog hop is to visit the other bloggers and make connections and friendships…so share the linky love!
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include one photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way 
                 To keep things fresh on the Hop PLEASE do not share a post that you have previously linked up.

          Any post that does not fit in the guidelines will be removed. Thank you for participating!!
 Clearwater Farm Journal










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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

What Do You Do With All of That Wool? Handspinning



If you read my blog then you know I am not a pro at Handspinning, and this will not be a tutorial on how to spin! Just sharing my experience, and what has helped me learn.

Mike bought me a Schacht Spinning Wheel, over 14 years ago. Most of those years it sat in a corner, while I was busy chasing around six children. It occasionally came out, long enough for me to get frustrated, and get  pushed back in the corner.

As we all know, those children grow up, and our twins (the babies) are now teenagers.
The Spinning Wheel has been moved out of the corner and has been getting quite a workout this past year.

Learning how to spin has been quite an adventure :) I have had to use several resources to get me going.

Lessons
I took a handspinning lesson at a Fiber Festival which was a great start.
I would have loved to take weekly lessons, but that was not an option in my area. I have had to use other resources.

Books There are many books out there on spinning.
I purchased a book, that I am always pulling out for reference, Teach Yourself Visually-Handspinning by Judith MacKenzie McCuin

Internet
There is a series on Knit Picks that was very helpful
http://tutorials.knitpicks.com/wptutorials/spinning-wheel-tutorial-part-1-the-basics/

I also browse youtube and have found several helpful videos as well. Just yesterday, I found a video and while watching it, had an A-Ha, moment. Something that had not been shown, in all of the other videos before. Fiber Artist all have their own style, and watching and trying different things, help you find your own.


It has taken me a while to pick up this whole handspinning thing, but I am finally at a point, where I feel like I know what I am doing. I have spun, plied and finished handspun yarn.

I love the Romney Roving that we processed, and it has been enjoyable to spin.
I have more than enough roving, to make the yarn for a big knitting project, a sweater, perhaps. Might as well think big! :)






Happy Spinning!


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Monday, May 19, 2014

Pasture Happenings


 
 2014 Lambing season has been over for a few weeks. It was an off year, lambing rate being very low compared to other years, more bottle babies than we have ever had in one year, almost all ram lambs.
The positive, very few losses.


Tunis Ewe Lamb (February Lamb)

Border Leicester Ewe Lam


We are at the time of year, that is the most enjoyable, when raising sheep. Everyone is out on pasture, and we are no longer hauling hay, or breaking up ice in the water barrels.
Everyone has been sheared, the lambing is done, and we get to do a lot of lamb watching, which is one of my favorite pastimes.

Romney/Border Leicester Ram Lamb



Jersey Steers


We moved the Jersey Steers from the barnyard out to pasture. The first one ran right through the gate, the one behind, is a little scaredy cow, it took two days of coaxing to finally get him to go through the gate. I guess it looks pretty intimidating!








We have been keeping our eye on things, making sure they don't harass the sheep. They seem to be more interested in the grass than they are the ewes, so all is well!

In the Spring, the grass grows faster than everyone can keep up. We will most likely have to mow some of it.  Once it gets too long the sheep will not eat it. The steers like the longer grass, but I don't think they will put much of a dent in it.

As the weather warms up, the grass will slow down. Hopefully, by then, we will have some interior fences up, for rotational grazing.

We have been very busy~ But we always make the time to sit back and watch lambs, even if it is just for a few minutes!

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Thursday, May 15, 2014

Our New Lawn Mower

Lawn mowing season is here, and we have too much of it, time consuming and costly (gas)

I decided we were going to have to find some help to keep up with the grass. Didn't take long to find the perfect candidate.






Temporary Fencing


I just needed to make sure he only mows where I want him to, so I purchased some new temporary fencing. A common name for it is ElectroNet, made by Premier. It is a 35 inch tall, electric, portable 164 foot fence.

The Tunis Ram ( Rusty) has been stuck in the barn.  I can't run him with the ewes, and the steers are in the barnyard so he has been in the only place that is left, a stall in the barn.

So this new situation is win-win!
We have a willing participant mowing the lawn (no whining or complaining)
He gets all the grass he can eat.

When we first started with sheep, many moons ago, we didn't have any permanent fencing on the farm. We purchased portable fencing. The sheep were put out for the day and bought in at night. It was a great solution until we had the permanent fence installed.  The ElectroNet was then used to help with rotational grazing. It held up for many years of use.

A good investment!


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The HomeAcre Hop #70


Wool Romney Roving

It has been a busy week!
In the garden the peas are all growing well, the lettuce never made an appearance, not sure what happened?
Picked up some Lemon Balm plants from a friend. I love Lemon Balm and have tried growing it from seed, but it never amounted to much. Hopefully, I will have better luck with some established plants.

We had had some success in the Mill this week and produced some our very first wool roving, which was very exciting for us! 

I hope this week finds you well, and you have time to link up some of your Spring Post!
I always look forward to reading them.

 HomeAcre  Host

Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front

Jenny@Black Fox Homestead

Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre

Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Heidi@Pint Size Farm

and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal



Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)

 

Featured Post:

Homemade Chapstick from Cultivate Nourishing

lindsey 041

Congratulations!
 We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.

Be sure to check out the HomeAcre Hop Pinterest Board where we share our Hop Favorites each week.


Clearwater Farm Journal
Featured




You are invited to share your original posts on: Homesteading, livestock care, gardening, environmentally friendly farming, self sufficiency, preparedness, off grid living, healthy recipes, home remedies and herbal concoctions, green living, homeschooling, food preservation, environmentally friendly crafts and home decor, photo posts of natural living and homesteading subjects! Now that’s a lot of information to share! If it fits any of these topics, we want to hear about it.  There are just a few little rules to follow:
  • Family friendly posts only. 
  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Link as many appropriate posts as you’d like each week. Older posts are great too.
  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop (on either host’s blog) with the button, text link, on the post, your side bar,or blog hop  page and please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business. 
  • Only share content that you have created.
  • Please remember that the whole idea of a blog hop is to visit the other bloggers and make connections and friendships…so share the linky love!
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include one photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way 
                 To keep things fresh on the Hop PLEASE do not share a post that you have previously linked up.

          Any post that does not fit in the guidelines will be removed. Thank you for participating!!
 Clearwater Farm Journal




 




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Wednesday, May 14, 2014

What Do You Do With All Of That Wool? Making Roving

What do you do with all of that wool? 

We get asked that question a lot!

We have bags of wool all over the shop.  We have skirted, and  washed many of the fleeces.
They have been piling up, waiting for further processing.

The mill has been one step forward, two steps back.. isn't that just how life is?

Well I am happy to report that we FINALLY picked, carded and made some roving tonight.
I was beginning to doubt that was ever going to happen! There are no manuals to read,  workshops, or college courses to attend that walk you through the process.

Thankfully, Mike is mechanically inclined, but even with machining in his background, there is a definite learning curve when it comes to running wool processing equipment, especially when that equipment is from the early 1900's.




There is still some tweaking left to do but I feel that there is a light at the end of the tunnel!






Wool Picker

After the wool is washed/dried, we run it through the picker. The purpose of picking, is to open up the wool fiber, to prepare it for carding. As you can see, it is an oldie, but it still runs great.

The first time we ran wool through the picker, we were quite surprised at what a mess it made, blowing wool all over the place!
That led to Mike building a picker box, to collect the wool, and to keep down the dust.




After we run the fleece through the picker it is ready for the carding machine.

Running the carder, has been the biggest challenge. Mike has spent numerous hours making adjustments, running the machine, making more adjustments, running it some more-that has went on for many months! It has been a long drawn out process. I am not much any help in the machinery department, so he has been on his own.

The carder does several things, it disentangles and straightens the wool and creates a wool batt.
The carding machine we have, has a roving attachment, which take the process one step further and lets us create wool roving.


Wool Carding Machine

Tonight we successfully ran some wool through the carding machine!
YEAH!!!

There are still a few things to do to make things run more smoothly, but I can't tell you how excited I am to finally see an end product.

Compliments of our Romney Ewes....Beautiful Romney Roving!


Romney Roving

I was beginning to think we would have to build another barn for all of those bags of wool that have been piling up, but it looks like that may not be necessary after all.



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Monday, May 12, 2014

On the Bookshelf: " Farm to Fork"


 
I love Thrift Stores and good deals. On my last visit at our local Thrift Shop, a cookbook caught my eye, "Farm to Fork".  Price tag, 99 cents. In the cart it goes.

I enjoy home cooking, I also enjoy simple recipes, never have been a fan of fancy, hard to find ingredients. After browsing through this cookbook, I am glad that I took a chance and picked it up.
It is just my kind of cookbook, I think I may have found a new "favorite".

I can't wait to try out all of the yummy recipes that fill every chapter.
Herbed Goat Cheese Buttons, Fresh Ricotta, Spiced Zucchini Bread, Sausage Stuffed Bell Peppers, Watermelon Limeade, Pear Tartlets, Roasted Brussels Sprouts, and the list goes on.

As I looked through the recipes, I made a mental list of the seeds, and plants, I will need to buy for my garden.
I think it is going to be a great resource and much needed motivation for the 2014 growing season.

A definite add to my bookshelf!


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Thursday, May 8, 2014

HomeAcre Hop #69


I hope you are all enjoying May!
I look forward to this weeks Hop!


HomeAcre  Host

Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front

Jenny@Black Fox Homestead

Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre

Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Heidi@Pint Size Farm

and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal



Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)

 

Featured Post: 


Canning Beef from Making Our Sustainable Life


Pressure canned beef

 

 

Congratulations!
 We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.

Be sure to check out the HomeAcre Hop Pinterest Board where we share our Hop Favorites each week.

Clearwater Farm Journal
Featured





You are invited to share your original posts on: Homesteading, livestock care, gardening, environmentally friendly farming, self sufficiency, preparedness, off grid living, healthy recipes, home remedies and herbal concoctions, green living, homeschooling, food preservation, environmentally friendly crafts and home decor, photo posts of natural living and homesteading subjects! Now that’s a lot of information to share! If it fits any of these topics, we want to hear about it.  There are just a few little rules to follow:
  • Family friendly posts only. 
  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Link as many appropriate posts as you’d like each week. Older posts are great too.
  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop (on either host’s blog) with the button, text link, on the post, your side bar,or blog hop  page and please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business. 
  • Only share content that you have created.
  • Please remember that the whole idea of a blog hop is to visit the other bloggers and make connections and friendships…so share the linky love!
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include one photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way 
                 To keep things fresh on the Hop PLEASE do not share a post that you have previously linked up.
          Any post that does not fit in the guidelines will be removed. Thank you for participating!!
 Clearwater Farm Journal




 




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Sunday, May 4, 2014

Doing More (Self Sufficiency)



I have been reading all sorts of blog post on gardening, and raising your own food for motivation!
It is time to shake the winter dust off and get busy!

I have a confession, I do not love gardening. We grow a garden and have for many years, but I have always had a hard time of it out here, especially  with weeds taking over my garden plot. I also do not appreciate Garter Snakes, bugs, and dirt under my fingernails. (I have tried wearing gloves, I would rather deal with dirt under my nails)

So why do I continue to plant one every year? 

I love homegrown veggies
I love canning and dehydrating the harvest
I love saving money

So even though gardening is not one of my favorite homesteading activities, we are expanding the garden.  I have a lot of experience in planting tomatoes, beans, peppers, and cucumbers but decided to try some new things this year. Potatoes, carrots, and some spring crops like snap peas and lettuce.
With food prices going up,up, up we have decided to put forth our best efforts to grow more veggies, and add some more fruit bushes and trees.

Mike did build a couple of raised beds last year and I will say that we had an easier time with the weeds. I think this year we will be adding a couple more. We also have a fenced in garden plot that we are going to use for the plants that take up more space.




Raising Meat for the freezer is another thing we are working on.
Our freezer was empty this past winter, except for some venison which I tolerate, but am not a big fan of.
We have raised steers for many years. Last year we decided to take the year off, I figured I would be able to find some local beef to buy for the freezer. That was not as easy as I thought. So last week , we picked up two feeder steers. We have always raised Belted Galloway, but this year we had a hard time finding feeders, and had to pick up two Jersey steers. I know that they are a Dairy Breed, but beggars can't be choosers. I have done some reading about raising Jersey Cows on grass and read some favorable comments, so we shall see.

Next week we are going back to the same farm we purchased the steers from, and are buying some feeder pigs.
That will be a new experience for us. We have purchased homegrown pork from a local farm, but he went out of business, so we figured we would try raising our own this year.
I have been reading all I can about raising pigs!

I am also contemplating meat chickens, jury is still out on that one. We have raised them before, so have some experience, we just need to look over housing issues.

One thing I need to remember- it always looks easier on paper.

My list is getting longer and longer!
I need to keep in mind, that we will have to maintain this garden, feed and house these animals, along with all of the other things that already keep us busy!

Raising a steer on grass-18 month commitment
Raising a Feeder Pig-3 month commitment
Raising Meat Chickens-6-12 week commitment

There are a lot of  things to take in consideration before adding additional responsibilities to the farm.

We can't do it all. I have learned that the hard way, on more than one occasion.
But, we can do more.
Now to decide what that "more"  is...

What "more" do you have planned for 2014





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Friday, May 2, 2014

Shepherdess Notes: Selling Bottle Lambs


Taking Turns

We have had some bottle lambs this year. More bottle lambs than we have had in all of the years we have raised sheep.

There weren't any that were "sole" bottle lambs. They were lambs that were supplemented because mom's milk supply was just not enough for them to thrive.  They behave like sheep, they are with the flock, they have mothers and they do what their mothers do.
They like us, but they aren't at the back door, bleating, waiting for us to come out and play, like typical bottle lambs.

I'm a coming....


They do come a running when they see us, they know we have bottles. But when they are done eating they do not follow us up to the house, they go back to the flock.

With so many bottle lambs, we  made the choice to sell all but two. For several reasons-

1. We get attached, and being all ram lambs but one, we knew we would have to sell them     sooner or later. It is easier on the girls if we sell them sooner. (okay, me too)

2. Lamb milk replacer is expensive! We do not have enough goats milk to feed 6 bottle lambs and still have some left for the Does to feed their own babies, and us. That means buying milk replacer, and at 80.00 a bag-that gets pricey!

3. It takes time!

We did keep two. One ewe lamb that I want to keep for breeding stock. Normally, I would not keep a bottle lamb as a replacement ewe but her mom is a ewe that I have had for years and has always been a great mother. Her age is a factor in her not being able to take care of twins this year.
The other lamb is Delaney's fair project.

We get inquiries when we are selling lambs and there are always questions. What may surprise some, is I  have a few questions of my own.  Even if you are trustworthy, I may not sell my lambs to you, and it isn't personal.

I will only sell a lamb to someone who already has at least one! Sheep are flock animals it would be very hard for these lambs who have mothers, and live out on pasture with other sheep, to be removed and put in living conditions where they are all alone! Especially the bottle lambs we had this year, they were part of a flock.

I prefer to sell two lambs together.

I had one family take one and come back for another. They said even with sheep, the older sheep were bullying the new lamb. (3 weeks old)

I am reluctant to sell them as pets, especially at Easter time.

I have made some exceptions, I have a friend who purchased a set of bottle lambs, 14 years ago for her daughter. Her daughter is now grown up and has her own kids and she still has one of those sheep. (the other died a couple of years ago).
She is buying one of our February Tunis Lambs (we are thrilled, he was one of our spoiled babies)

She understands that buying a lamb for a pet is a commitment. They can live a long time.  They also have needs.
Housing, hay, minerals/salt, sheared every year, on occasion-vet care, etc.



14 year old Bambi
Do bottle lambs make good pets? 

Yes, they can!
But as with any other animal, there are things to take in consideration. It is a commitment, and should not be done on a whim. Sheep are livestock animals, and typically live on a farm/homestead. These 15 pound babies turn into 200 pound wethers.

I try to make sure the lambs go to good homes, and that the buyers know what they are getting themselves into.  I do not want to get a call that the lambs died, or they no longer want them.
So, when I ask questions, it is for the benefit of both parties, not to pass judgement.

As with all of my sheep post, this is just the way we do things and my personal opinions :)

Have a Great Weekend!





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Thursday, May 1, 2014

HomeAcre Hop #68



Before we move on to the Hop this week, I want to let you know of a few changes that are taking place.
Ann from Summer Acres will no longer be co-hosting the hop, we were sad to see her go and she will be missed!
We have a new co-host Heidi from Pint Size Farm. Be sure to stop by her blog and welcome her to the Hop!

HomeAcre  Host

Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front

Jenny@Black Fox Homestead

Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre

Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Heidi@Pint Size Farm

and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal


Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)

 

Featured Post:

Gardening With Pigs from Home Farming Scents

Congratulations!
 We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.

Be sure to check out the HomeAcre Hop Pinterest Board where we share our Hop Favorites each week.

Clearwater Farm Journal
Featured




You are invited to share your original posts on: Homesteading, livestock care, gardening, environmentally friendly farming, self sufficiency, preparedness, off grid living, healthy recipes, home remedies and herbal concoctions, green living, homeschooling, food preservation, environmentally friendly crafts and home decor, photo posts of natural living and homesteading subjects! Now that’s a lot of information to share! If it fits any of these topics, we want to hear about it.  There are just a few little rules to follow:
  • Family friendly posts only. 
  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Link as many appropriate posts as you’d like each week. Older posts are great too.
  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop (on either host’s blog) with the button, text link, on the post, your side bar,or blog hop  page and please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business. 
  • Only share content that you have created.
  • Please remember that the whole idea of a blog hop is to visit the other bloggers and make connections and friendships…so share the linky love!
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. We will also include one photo from your post in the interest of sending visitors your way 
                 To keep things fresh on the Hop PLEASE do not share a post that you have previously linked up.
          Any post that does not fit in the guidelines will be removed. Thank you for participating!!
 Clearwater Farm Journal








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