Monday, December 23, 2013

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year



I would like to wish you a Very Merry Christmas from the Farm!

I hope you all get to enjoy the holiday with family and friends.

See you in the New Year!


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Thursday, December 19, 2013

Come And Get It



 We haven't been taking any pictures of the sheep these days. It has been too cold to stand around outdoors taking snapshots, and the sheep have been hunkering down, trying to stay warm.

Today, we are having a heat wave, it's almost 40 degrees. I wanted to get pictures before the snow is gone from all of the rain we are suppose to get, but my camera is dead and I cannot locate my charger anywhere!! Frustrating!

I did manage to get a shot with my phone of our sweet, little, ewe lambs. We have them separated from the flock because the ewes are just too pushy and were not letting the lambs get enough feed.
When we go out they just stand there waiting, hoping we have breakfast!

We have been feeding more hay, more often to help them keep warm. It has been an unusually cold December. I am glad that we did not shear the ewes in September like we had planned. They really needed that extra fleece to keep warm!

I will be taking a break over the Christmas Holidays! I have a daughter coming home from school, a husband who will be on a vacation from his day job, birthdays, Christmas parties, and just plain ole' family time!

I hope you all have a Wonderful Christmas!
See you in the New Year :)




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Happy Holidays at the HomeAcre Hop!

Happy Holidays Banner photo HappyHolidaysHomeacreHopBanner_zpsf9321887.jpg



We would like to welcome you to the last week of our Holiday HomeAcre Hop! We invite you to share your Holiday Post with us! Regular post are welcome too!

Make sure to visit our Pinterest Board where we will be pinning our favorites.
http://www.pinterest.com/foxhomestead/happy-holidays/


HomeAcre  Host:

Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front
Ann@ Summer Acres
Jenny@Black Fox Homestead
Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre
and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal


Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)




 Featured Post:
 Repurposed Barn Floor Star from the Chick 'n' coop.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aDv9cd9egFk/UL62kdVHDSI/AAAAAAAADpI/n8c67iMMQcM/s280/christmassoapstar+029.jpg



Congratulations!
We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.

Clearwater Farm Jounral





There are just a few little rules to follow:

  •  Family friendly posts only. ‘Nuff said

  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.

  •  Link as many seasonal and Thanksgiving posts as you’d like! Older posts, homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts are great too.

  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!

  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop in the post, your side bar, or a blog hop page (with the button or a text link). Please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!

  •  Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.

  •  By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. Posts may be pinned to Pinterest, shared on Facebook, or promoted on Google+ and Twitter. :)

Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.
Clearwater Farm Journal




Saturday, December 14, 2013

Before and After

 
 
 
Destined for the Burn Pile!
Saved!
New (old) Kitchen Cabinet!
 
 
 
 






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Friday, December 13, 2013

Some Days are Just Hard



“A farm is a manipulative creature. There is no such thing as finished. Work comes in a stream and has no end. There are only the things that must be done now and things that can be done later. The threat the farm has got on you, the one that keeps you running from can until can't, is this: do it now, or some living thing will wilt or suffer or die. Its blackmail, really.”
― Kristin Kimball, The Dirty Life: On Farming, Food, and Love



Not the most encouraging quote, but today it fits!
Some days are just hard!
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Thursday, December 12, 2013

Happy Holidays at the HomeAcre Hop!



Happy Holidays Banner photo HappyHolidaysHomeacreHopBanner_zpsf9321887.jpg

We would like to welcome you to the Holiday HomeAcre Hop! We invite you to share your Holiday Post with us for the next two weeks! Regular post are welcome too!

Make sure to visit our Pinterest Board where we will be pinning our favorites.
http://www.pinterest.com/foxhomestead/happy-holidays/


HomeAcre  Host:

Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front
Ann@ Summer Acres
Jenny@Black Fox Homestead
Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre
and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal


Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)



Featured Post:

Venison Bacon Sausage from Green Eggs and Goats
 
Venison Bacon Sausage 


Congratulations!
We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.




Clearwater Farm Journal




There are just a few little rules to follow:
  •  Family friendly posts only. ‘Nuff said
  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.
  •  Link as many seasonal and Thanksgiving posts as you’d like! Older posts, homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts are great too.
  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop in the post, your side bar, or a blog hop page (with the button or a text link). Please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!
  •  Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  •  By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. Posts may be pinned to Pinterest, shared on Facebook, or promoted on Google+ and Twitter. :)

Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.


Clearwater Farm Journal


Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Grinding Wheat, Easy as 1,2,3




This is a more detailed post about making flour and grain mills.

Most of the flour I make is Whole Wheat Flour. I purchase the wheat berries in bulk, 25 pound bags or in 5 gallon buckets, (45 #)  I have purchased it from Walton Wheat, Wheat Montana and a few local sources.

I have used  Hard Red Wheat,  Hard White Wheat and Soft White Wheat.
I prefer the Hard White. The Soft White Wheat is for pastries and is not used in bread making.

The hard wheat berries have a long term shelf life. 6+ years.
The soft white wheat berries have a shelf life of about 6 months but can be stored in the freezer for longer storage.

I have three grain mills.

A Kitchen Aid Grain Mill which is an attachment for the Kitchen Aid Mixer, and  was my first grain mill purchase. I found out very quickly that it does not make a fine enough flour for me! The one benefit that it does have is the courser settings that allow you to have cracked wheat.
Average Price is 130.00

I also have a Back to Basics Hand Grain Mill which  I purchased for emergencies. I have used it twice, one of those times being yesterday to take pictures. It is a simple, reliable hand grain mill.
If you do not expect to make much flour it would be a good fit. It has a clamp that you use to attach it to a counter or table. You put the wheat in a hopper and use a hand crank. It takes about 6 minutes to grind one cup of flour, and it will give you a little work out!
Average Price is 78.00






The grain mill I depend on is the K-tec Grain Mill. It is very easy to use. You place the top (which has the motor) on the bottom canister and snap into place. You put the wheat in the hopper and turn it on. It grinds up to 24 cups in 8 minutes.  It is loud! Some of the other Grain Mills are quieter, but as I mentioned before, 20 plus years later and  I still use it on a regular basis, so I see no need to replace it.
Average Price is 179.00















You can replace white flour in almost any recipe. 1 cup white flour=3/4 cup plus 2 T wheat flour.
Wheat flour breaks down more slowly in your digestive system,  gradually increasing its use is a good idea!

I started with replacing 1/4 of the white flour in the recipe with the wheat flour, then with 1/2 and now I use mostly wheat flour.
Wheat flour has 60 percent more fiber and vitamins than the white flour does. It is a good alternative!



Saturday, December 7, 2013

DoTerra Giveaway Winner!

 essential oil giveaway









We have a winner for the Giveaway-Congratulations Karen F.!

Thank you Jenny Hulbert for sponsoring the giveaway!


For the month of December, you can visit Jenni’s page receive a free Frankincense oil with qualifying purchase!

http://www.mydoterra.com/jennihulburt/

Thursday, December 5, 2013

The HomeAcre Hop #48

Did Someone say Hay?

Winter chores have begun!

I can't complain too much, the girls feed and water the animals almost every day.  The weather has been mild so there has not been any complaining. That will change with the weather. The colder it gets the less exciting it gets! Mike and I will be called into service when that happens.

Right now I am enjoying the warmer temps!

I look forward to seeing what you all have been up to!

HomeAcre  Host:

Mary@Homegrown on the Hill
Kathi@Oak Hill Homestead
Nancy@Prudent Living on the Home Front
Ann@ Summer Acres
Jenny@Black Fox Homestead
Lisa Lynn@Self Sufficient Home Acre
and Me @Clearwater Farm Journal


Each host will feature her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. that means your chances of being featured are even better! Visit each of the blogs to see if you were featured this week! (Don't forget to link back to one of our blogs if you'd like to be featured!)


FEATURED POST:

How to make a Burlap Wreath by The Little Acre that Could




 

Homemade Ricotta Cheese by Urban Overalls


curds that have formed
Congratulations!  If you would like to be featured in the future, be sure to link back to the hop. We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured blogger this week. If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog.

  

Clearwater Farm Journal






There are just a few little rules to follow:
  •  Family friendly posts only. ‘Nuff said
  • Please, no posts dedicated to advertising products.
  •  Link as many seasonal and Thanksgiving posts as you’d like! Older posts, homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts are great too.
  • Please visit as many of the other posts as you can and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop in the post, your side bar, or a blog hop page (with the button or a text link). Please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google + and/or Pinterest!
  •  Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  •  By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post if you are featured. Posts may be pinned to Pinterest, shared on Facebook, or promoted on Google+ and Twitter. :)

Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.

Clearwater Farm Journal



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Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Making Your Own Flour



One of the best kitchen investments I have made over the years is a grain mill. I purchased a K-tec Grain Mill over 20 years ago. (Wow, that makes me feel old).
At that time it was the only mill in my price range.  

The investment has paid off. I have used the mill on a regular basis since it's purchase and it has never let me down. I do like some of the features on the new grain mills, but I am too frugal to buy another mill, when the one I have still works great.

I use it to grind wheat, rye, oats, corn, and spelt. It can also grind other grains and legumes, as long as they are dry.

I grind about 4-5 pounds of grain at one time. I store the flour in labeled, gallon size bags, in the freezer to keep the flour from going rancid.

I save money and have a healthy alternative to the flours I can buy at the local grocery store.

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Sunday, December 1, 2013

Spinning Tunis Wool



Mike processed some roving with some of the Tunis Wool we had from our last shearing. It is very different than spinning the Romney Wool. It is a finer, shorter wool and I am having a hard time making the adjustments needed.

 I do find, I am very good at making slubs. What is a slub? Well in the fiber world, a slub is large, uneven textures in yarn, and if you don't already know, that is not something
brag about!

Oh well, practice, practice, practice!

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