Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Washing a Wool Comforter Batt




I was cleaning out some things in the basement and as I was looking through some totes, I found a wool comforter batt.  I had forgotten all about it!   It was a batt from one our fleeces, that was processed at a woolen mill and covered with cheesecloth. The cheesecloth was in terrible shape-main reason I ended up putting it in a  tote, until I got around to repairing it, someday!

I decided today would be the day. I removed the tattered cheesecloth and made the determination that the batt  needed washed. I was happy to be able to use our new wash area in the wool shop. 

When washing a comforter made from wool you want to wash it the same way you would wash a fleece, no agitation.

I filled one of the deep sinks with hot water, added soap and carefully added the wool batt.

I let it soak for one hour. That may have been overkill but it was pretty musty and dusty. I placed the batt in our extractor, I wasn't expecting the batt to be so heavy, but I did manage to get it in. The extractor is  a little intimidating to use but I am sure I will get use to it. I love that the wool comes out with all  the water removed.

I then placed the batt in a sink full of warm water. Let it soak for about 30 minutes-placed it back into the extractor to remove the water.

Laid it out to dry-It doesn't fit in our wool drying area so I bought it in the house and laid it over the dining room table. If it was daylight, I would have hung it outside.

Now to put a new covering on the batt. I decided against cheesecloth, I don't think it held up well enough.  I am going to use muslin, or maybe a printed fabric so I won't need to use a Duvet cover.

Not sure yet,  I will have to see what our local JoAnne Fabric Store has to offer!

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11 comments:

  1. How interesting! We've had sheep before, but we never made anything like a wool comforter. Thanks for sharing.
    Fern

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  2. Oh that sounds like it is going to be perfect with the muslin. I love my front loader for this kind of work. Wish I had nice wool batting like yours instead of down from who knows where:) Hug B

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  3. I love muslin, and unbleached cotton too. I could have used a wool comforter last night. -5*C! The frost looked like snow.

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  4. Nice! Someday I dream that I will have a wool house to do this sort of stuff in.

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  5. I cannot even picture what this is. It sounds huge and heavy. Is it like a quilt?

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    1. It is just batting that is made from wool. It is not heavy, well unless it is wet :) It is a little thicker than quilt batting. I have a quilt batt too stored away in another tote, the quilt needs repaired.
      It is wool (raw fleece) that is washed and carded into a large batt. Just like what you see at the fabric stores for comforters and quilts. The one I have is a full/queen size. It makes great bedding!

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  6. How neat! I'm always nervous washing things that aren't easy and you can put right in the washing machine. But sounds like with a little effort it can be done!

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  7. Hi, Just clicked on your post on the Pig and Dac Blogger's Digest hop today to find this interesting post! You're going to have one super cozy blanket when you're done :) I've always loved sheep, they're such cute little creatures. What else do you do with their wool?

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for stopping by Laura,
      The wool can be used to make roving which is then spun into yarn.
      Our Border Leicester Fleeces have been purchased to make doll hair and Santa beards too.

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  8. My grandmother raised sheep in the 40's and 50's. When my mother died a couple of years ago, I received an old comforter with wool batting. I would like a new cover on it but am not sure how I should clean/wash it before.

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